Online of Source of Brand Colors

BrandColors.net Screen ShootA lovely online source of brand colors complete with color numbers—no guessing. Includes colors from Adobe, Airbnb, Amazon, AOL, Basecamp, Behance, Better Business Bureau (they have colors?), Bing, bitly, Boeing, Digg, Dribbble, Drupal, Ebay,  Firefox (a big palette), Freshbooks (very fresh), Google, HootSuite, Kickstarter, Klout, Microsoft, and many more. Memorable address BrandColors.net.

Has a search function to find one quickly.

Click on the colors to see the color number.

You can download the whole set in several file formats including swatches to import into Photoshop, and I’m sure other  programs as well.

My favorite for color storage is still Color Schemer. It works.

New York Times Chronicle

Counting Names and Phrases in the Times

Chronicle LogoLogo for New York Times R & DThe New York Times Chronicle is  a new resource for “visualizing language usage in New York Times news coverage throughout its history,” which began in 1851. Enter a word or phrase and it will appear as a colored line on a graph showing the percentage of articles it appeared in from 1851 to the present. You can search several words or phrases sequentially and each one will appear in a different color so you can compare them.

Or you can ask for the number of articles. “Obama”first appeared in 2004 in .1% of the articles. In 2009, peaked at 6.63%. In 2012 he appeared in the highest number of articles: 19,675. The peak percentage in 2009 and the peak number in 2012 probably indicates that  they published more articles in 2009. Numbers are not always as clear as we are led to believe they are.

What Are They Measuring?

Jackson Pollack appeared in 1 article in 1944, 2 in 1957, 6 in 1964, and peaked at 8 in 1980. He died in August 1956 and did not appear at all. I think there is a problem with this data. His market soared in 1961 but there were only 3 articles. He continued to be mentioned 1-5 times until 1985 when he dropped off the graph again. He appears a few times more but not as often as I would have expected. Low percentages, yes. Low numbers, no.

Not sure what they are measuring. If someone quotes this data, are they quoting the actual number of appearances or the number that the NYT Labs counted? Either way it is still interesting and I’m sure it will be quoted often.

Export the Data

You can also export the data. Not sure the export will work for you. This is a small excerpt of the export on abolition:

{“article_matches”:289,”year”:1856,”total_articles_published”:18162},{“article_matches”:168,”year”:1857,”total_articles_published”:18168},{“article_matches”:187,”year”:1858,”total_articles_published”:17388},{“article_matches”:177,”year”:1859,”total_articles_published”:14595},{“article_matches”:447,”year”:1860,”total_articles_published”:19288},{“article_matches”:372,”year”:1861,”total_articles_published”:27009},{“article_matches”:424,”year”:1862,”total_articles_published”:25180},{“article_matches”:277,”year”:1863,”total_articles_published”:22563},{“article_matches”:220,”year”:1864,”total_articles_published”:20458},{“article_matches”:328,”year”:1865,”total_articles_published”:22727},

And Produces a List of the Articles

To see the actual numbers and dates, you put the cursor over the line on the graph. If you click on the line, you are taken to a list of the articles with an excerpt. That is really fine.

A very nice resource. One to remember.

 

Comic Books & Strips

ComicBook+ is an archive of public domain Golden and Silver Age Comic Books and newspaper comic strips. 24,184 books as of today. Categorized by type and date. Also has a forum for comics lovers and collectors.

Invisible Scarlet O'Neil from a 1940 comic Strip

Invisible Scarlet O’Neil from a 1940′s comic Strip

All can be downloaded without cost (donations welcome). And you can subscribe of $7.00 a year. Uses PayPal, which is very convenient. No entering credit card or passing a vision test to read a scrunched up series of random letters.

Invisible Scarlet O’Neil was written and drawn by Russell Stamm, who had previously worked on Dick Tracy. She first appeared in the pages of the Chicago Times, June 3, 1940. Scarlet O’Neil has the claim to fame of being one of the very first super heroines. As her name suggests Scarlet has the power of invisibility. This power was created when Scarlet put her finger in an experimental ray created by her scientist father. She suddenly disappeared, but luckily figured out that touching a nerve in her wrist acted as a switch, so she could turn her invisibility off and on at will.Over time Scarlet O’Neil’s special talent was slowly dropped from the strip until in 1950 it was renamed to just ‘Scarlet O’Neil’. A year later a new character named Stainless Steel was introduced. In 1955 the strip was retitled Stainless Steel, promptly folding the next year. As for Scarlet O’Neil she has yet to switch her off her invisibility and no one knows where she is.

It was hard to find an image of a woman without her skirt half way up to her waist or an obvious  accessory for a male character. Such were the comics.

iconsSketchAtive

Free Icons

A collection of free icons created by “Aegean K.”

360 outline and 360 matching solid vector and bitmap formats. Transparent individual files in 60px & 120px for Coding. JPG files for overview and detail revealing. Sketch files for Editing, fully scalable and adjustable. You can use these icons in tab bar, navigation bar and table row for both iOS and Android apps. Also in web design, branding, stickers, presentations and prints. Anywhere you want.

Very fine icons. Highly recommended.

The Art of Hand Lettering

Handlettered word "Bravo" by Neil Secretario

By Neil Secretario

The Art of Hand Lettering is a fabulous archive of hand lettering for logos, signs, murals, stationery, etc. A new site so the examples are only from 2013-2014. A wide range of styles in black and white and full color, all beautiful and mesmerizing. This “Bravo” example is by Neil Secretario and was done  using a Pentel Pigment Ink Brush Pen, which I am ready to run out and buy.

Neil is a freelance designer and letterer in California who specializes in custom lettering, graphic design, and branding. HIs site is a bit of a tease since he includes only sections of nine examples of his work. They are still worth a look.

The newsletter is sometimes a single image but often shows a series of photographs of a work in progress. One series of nine photos from August 2013 shows Bryan Patrick Todd in a cherry picker preparing and painting a very big mural on a very big wall in Louisville, “Our City, Our Home”. A more extensive series of photos is on Bryan’s website.

The branding exercise by Tobias Hall is a mind-boggling example of precision and complexity. There are similar examples on his website.

Tobias Hall Handlettered Branding TobiasHall-2 TobiasHall-3 TobiasHall-4 TobiasHall-5 TobiasHall-6 TobiasHall-7

 

 

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Esther Honig: A Beautiful Woman?

Esther Honig sent her photo to photographers in 25 countries and asked them to make her beautiful. The amazing photos are on her website. They span the full range of what is considered beautiful internationally and individually.

For those who don’t know Photoshop it will be a lesson on how little you can believe a photograph once it’s met a computer.